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Comic Book Excerpts:
God

Excerpts

BELOW: Muslim villagers chant "Alla Hu Akbar" after the Muslim super-heroine Dust repels Taliban invaders from their town. Usually transliterated as "Allahu Akbar," this Arabic phrase means "God is great." This expression is commonly known as the "takbir".

Muslim villagers chant Alla Hu Akbar after the Muslim super-heroine Dust repels Taliban invaders from their town. takbir; God is great; Allahu Akbar

Source: Young X-Men #1 (June 2008): "Final Genesis", pg. 11, panels 2-4. Written by Marc Guggenheim. Art by Yanick Paquette, Ray Snyder. See also: God; chant; gratitude to God; Muslim; Dust (Sooraya Qadir); Bakwa townspeople

BELOW: Spider-Man prays with Superman: Well, almost. The new star reporter at the Daily Bugle is a direct Superman parody. Deeply religious, he pulls his co-worker Peter Parker (a.k.a. Spider-Man) into a closet in order to pray to the Lord. Ethan is secretly arranging an opportunity to use his healing powers on Peter, but his deep religiosity and his sentiments about prayer are sincere, as seen in the following issues. Ethan tells Peter, "Open your heard to the Lord." Ethan also advises, "Don't underestimate the power of prayer, Peter." A fascinating reveal comes at the end of Marvel Knights Spider-Man #18: Reed Richards researched Ethan Edwards extensively and found that the ability to heal others was NOT among the powers he had been imbued with by his father. The last page of issue #18 reveals that Ethan's power to heal really did come from prayer.

Spider-Man prays with Superman

Source: Marvel Knights Spider-Man #14 (July 2005): "Wild Blue Yonder, Part Two", pg. 11, panels 1-7. Written by Reginald Hudlin. Art by Billy Tan, Jon Sibal. See also: God; prayer; Protestant; Spider-Man (Peter Parker); Ethan Edwards

BELOW: After the Chitauri bomb the Ultimates' headquarters, Captain America thinks about how much he hates the Chitauri alien invaders. He also thinks about God and prophecy.

Resentment was so thick in the back of his throat that he could practically spit it out. God, he hated them. Hated them worse than he'd ever hated the Nazis or the Japs. He would have killed them all himself, shot them in the back as they fled. If God Himself came down and gave Steve Rogers the gift of prophecy, and he knew that the Chitauri would leave tomorrow and never come back, he would still have killed them as they fled onto their ships.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 72. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: God; hate; prophecy; Captain America (Steve Rogers); Nazis

BELOW: When Rocket Red #4 (who later joins the Justice League) expressed belief in God, Rocket Red #5 chides him for doing so.

Dmitri, We're not supposed to believe in God.

Source: Justice League (vol. 1) #3 (July 1987): "Meltdown". Written by Keith Giffen, J. M. DeMatteis. Art by Keith Giffen, Kevin Maguire, Al Gordon. See also: God; belief; Atheist; Communist; Rocket Red (Dimitri Pushkin); Rocket Red #5 (Alexei)

BELOW: Tony Stark (Iron Man) contemplates the dark "secrets" of his fellow Ultimates:

Then again it wasn't like Banner was the only one whose character could be considered . . . murky. They all had secrets... Who knew what sins Hawkeye would be atoning for when he finally met his maker? Years in SHIELD's black ops would have piled them up by the dozen.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 7. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: God; sin; atone; Maker (God); afterlife; Hawkeye (Clint Barton); S.H.I.E.L.D.

BELOW: Nick Fury voices a hope he has about God putting an end to Tony Stark's penchant for verbal nonsense:

He'd lost Nick. "Sometimes I hope that God will one day decide that you can only shovel so much bullsh--," Nick said, "and then he's going to strike you dead."

"He might," Tony said. "He just might. But before he does, let's go into another room where I've set up a little presentation..."

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 8. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: God; Iron Man (Tony Stark); Nick Fury

BELOW: Rick thanks God the snow is letting up and Dale says it is about time God gave them a break: When Rick says "Thank God the snow let up," he may or may not just be using the phrase "thank God" as an expression of speech. But Dale decides to interpret the expression somewhat literally, and refers to God pointedly, saying that God has got to stop giving them such a hard time. At various times, Dale is something of the "moral center" of this group of survivors. His statement here may be light banter, but it also may stem from a genuine belief that God is in control and that God was in some way responsible for the zombie apocalypse as well as the weather.

Rick thanks God the snow is letting up and Dale says it is about time God gave them a break

Dale: It's a bumpy ride, but we'll be fine as long as I take it slow. We should be on the road in no time.

Rick: Thank God the snow let up, eh?

Dale: He's gotta stop sh--ting on us sometime, y'know?

Source: The Walking Dead #7 (Apr. 2004): "Miles Behind Us, Part 1", pg. 10, panels 2-4. Written by Robert Kirkman. Art by Charlie Adlard. See also: God; gratitude to God; Rick Grimes; Dale Horvath

BELOW: Nick Fury refers to Tony Stark's new Chitauri-detection technology as "voice of God network thingamajig":

I got a guerrilla ant army out there, Nick thought, but no way to control it until Tony gets his voice of God networking thingamajig set up.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 253. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: God; Iron Man (Tony Stark); Nick Fury