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Comic Book Excerpts:
Catholic

BELOW: The Punisher visits his informant Mickey Fondozzi in St. Anscom's Catholic Church in Brooklyn:

The Punisher visits his informant Mickey Fondozzi in St. Anscom's Catholic Church in Brooklyn

Source: Marvel Knights (vol. 1) #11 (May 2001): "Hero for Hire", pg. 14-15. Written by Chuck Dixon. Art by Eduardo Barreto, Nelson DeCastro. See also: church (interior); Catholic; The Punisher (Frank Castle); Mickey Fondozzi

BELOW: The Punisher finds his long-time informant Mickey Fondozzi praying in St. Anscom's Catholic Church, a place the man has lately been spending considerable time at. The Punisher initially believes that former criminal Mickey Fondozzi has come to the church seeking sanctuary, a place to be safe from the Punisher himself. The Punisher is mistaken. Fondozzi is there to pray. Note Mickey Fondozzi's words: "...lead us not into temptation..." He is reciting the Lord's Prayer.

The Punisher finds his long-time informant Mickey Fondozzi praying in St. Anscom's Catholic Church, a place the man has lately been spending considerable time at.

Source: Marvel Knights (vol. 1) #11 (May 2001): "Hero for Hire", pg. 14. Written by Chuck Dixon. Art by Eduardo Barreto, Nelson DeCastro. See also: prayer; church (interior); Lord's Prayer; cross; sanctuary; temptation; kneeling; Catholic; The Punisher (Frank Castle); Mickey Fondozzi

BELOW: Since experiencing Dagger's soul-cleansing light daggers, the Punisher's informant Mickey Fondozzi has sincerely repented of his criminal ways: Interestingly enough, the Punisher finds that Mickey Fondozzi's change of heart frustrates his own mission. Fondozzi was one of the Punisher's principal informants (or "snitches"). But now that Fondozzi has "found religion" (as the Punisher puts it), the man is no longer useful to the vigilante.

Since experiencing Dagger's soul-cleansing light daggers, the Punisher's informant Mickey Fondozzi has sincerely repented of his criminal ways

Source: Marvel Knights (vol. 1) #11 (May 2001): "Hero for Hire", pg. 16. Written by Chuck Dixon. Art by Eduardo Barreto, Nelson DeCastro. See also: repentance; prayer; church (interior); soul; angel; novena; religion (the word "religion"); Catholic; The Punisher (Frank Castle); Dagger (Tandy Bowen); Mickey Fondozzi

BELOW: Eddie Brock ("Venom") was moved by Mel Gibson's "Passion of the Christ" to renounce villainy, sell The Symbiote, and donate the money to charity: The Terrible Tinkerer conducts an auction for super-villains in which Eddie Brock is auctioning off the alien symbiote that transforms him into Venom - selling the symbiote to the highest bidder. Note how Mysterio questions whether Eddie Brock's actions are truly "Christ-like." It is not every day you see a super-villain question whether somebody's actions are "Christ-like." But Eddie Brock's spiritual motivations in this case are very sincere, and hearken back to the earliest beginnings of this Catholic character, who first merged with The Symbiote after a sincere prayer in a Catholic church. Note how the Tinkerer refers to Eddie Brock's "crisis of faith." This term is usually used to describe as a period of doubt that causes one to question one's beliefs. In this case, Eddie Brock has come to doubt his life as a villain, and is actually turning back to his religious faith.

Eddie Brock (Venom) was moved by Mel Gibson's Passion of the Christ to renounce villainy, sell The Symbiote, and donate the money to charity

Source: Marvel Knights Spider-Man #6 (Nov. 2004): "Venomous: Part Two", pg. 23, panels 2-4. Written by Mark Millar. Art by Terry Dodson, Rachel Dodson. See also: charity; Christ-like; faith; repentance; crisis of faith; Catholic; Venom (Eddie Brock); Jesus Christ (Jesus of Nazareth); Tinkerer (Phineas T. Mason); The Symbiote; Mysterio (Daniel Berkhart); Mel Gibson

BELOW: Black Cat touts the benefits of her "good Catholic School education": The Black Cat has a long history of working as a cat burglar and a mercenary for questionable employers. Despite her efforts to reform and work more as a hero, is clear that as an adult she has not been a practicing Catholic. Yet her reference to a Catholic School education may hint at having been raised Catholic. Oddly enough, Spider-Man here calls Black Cat "Miss Kyle" instead of by her actual name (Miss Hardy), in an apparent reference to DC Comics' Catwoman (Selina Kyle), who has been explicitly identified as a non-practicing Catholic.

Black Cat touts the benefits of her good Catholic School education

Source: Marvel Knights Spider-Man #10 (Mar. 2005): "Last Stand: Part 2", pg. 11, panel 3. Written by Mark Millar. Art by Terry Dodson, Rachel Dodson. See also: Catholic school; Catholic; Black Cat (Felicia Hardy)

BELOW: Captain America identifies a Chitauri masquerading as a young man as Puerto Rican based on his Virgin Mary T-shirt:

It looked like a kid, maybe nineteen years old, Puerto Rican if the T-shirt of the Virgin Mary was anything to go by.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 154. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: Catholic; Mary; Eddie Guzman

BELOW: Rockslide invokes "Holy God!": Young X-Men Rockslide, Wolf Cub and Dust attacked Magma (having been misled by Donald Pierce disguised as Cyclops). Magma super-heated Dust in her sand form, turning her to glass. Rockslide, a nominal Catholic, utters "Holy God!" in shock and perhaps as an unconscious prayer. Coincidentally, the "glassified" Dust (who is a Muslim) appears in this panel remarkably like a statue of the Virgin Mary. This is probably unintentional.

Rockslide invokes Holy God!

Source: Young X-Men #3 (Aug. 2008): "LifeDeath", pg. 9, panel 2. Written by Marc Guggenheim. Art by Yanick Paquette, Ray Snyder, Kris Justice. See also: invoking deity; Catholic; Rockslide (Santo Vaccarro)