ComicBookReligion.com logo

Comic Book Excerpts:
gods

Excerpts

BELOW: Nick Fury feels he can't admit the possibity of Norse gods (e.g. Thor), because it would force him to adopt a whole new framework or worldview: Nick Fury is frustrated by his own inability to make up his mind about what he believes about Thor and Thor's claims of divine nature.

From the bridge of the Altair, Nick watched Thor join the battle. If there's one thing I hate, he thought, it's not being able to make a decision. And I just cannot decide whether Thor is the real thing or not. All of the jabbering about Loki makes me think he's a nutcase, but then he brings the lightning and teleports bombs to other dimensions.He just doesn't fit in any framework I can put together.

One possibility, Nick had to admit, was that he needed a new framework, but he was not about to admit the existence of Norse gods. If you let the Norse gods in, next thing you knew you had Kali and Ogun and Quetzalcoatl and Jesus H. Christ Himself wearing costumes and fighting bad guys. No man could stay sane for long if he took that scenario seriously.

Whatever Thor was, he sure could kick a--. that was what Nick needed right then, and that was all he was going to think about until this operation was over and they could all take a breath.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 303. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; disbelief; Jesus Christ; Hindu; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Vodoun; Aztec; Christian (generic); Mayan; Jesus Christ (Jesus of Nazareth); Ogun; Quetzalcoatl; Kali

BELOW: Nick Fury tells Thor he doesn't believe in any gods:

Fury put down his pen and squeezed the bridge of his nose. "Okay," he said with his eyes closed. "I get it. If I have to raise my right hand and swear that I believe you're the Norse god of thunder just to get you to leave, I'll do it." He raised his right hand, looking down at his desk. Ten seconds or so later, he looked up. "You're not gone."

"You're not very convincing," Thor said.

"Neither are you, Mister Son of Odin, or Wotan, or whatever we're supposed to call him. I don't believe in gods--any of them--and until you bring Jesus Christ himself in to walk across the Upper Bay from Battery Park to here, that isn't going to change. Far as I'm concerned, you're a garden-variety anti-globalization wacko who got hold of some tech that nobody can reverse-engineer. Doesn't make you anything special."

Thor had started smiling at "Wotan," and couldn't stop. "Quite a speech, General Fury."

"You provoke me," Fury said.

"Well. Let me provoke you to pay attention."

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 38-39. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; impiety; disbelief; Jesus Christ; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Atheist; Non-Religious; Christian (generic); Thor (Donald Blake); Nick Fury; Jesus Christ (Jesus of Nazareth); Odin

BELOW: Impressed by the way Thor saved his fellow Ultimates, Iron Man jokes that he will become a Norse god himself:

"Wha . . . ?" Tony's eyes rolled in Nick's direction... "Everyone?"

"Yeah," Nick said. "Thor got them out."

..."That crazy son of a b----. He did, huh?"

Nick nodded. "Yeah, he did."

"Good for him... I'm going to quit this robot suit business and become a Norse god," Tony said through the chattering of his teeth.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 334. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Iron Man (Tony Stark); Thor (Donald Blake)

BELOW: Thor explicitly refers to himself as the "God of Thunder" in response to the Hulk's impious banter: The Hulk was one of the founding members of the Avengers, but his time with the team was shot-lived. The friction between the Hulk and his teammates is evident in this Avengers meeting when the the Hulk calls Thor a "yellow-haired yahoo" and threatens to "boot him up to Asgard for good!" Thor, demonstrating his genuinely godly self-identity, responds: "You dare speak so to the God of Thunder?!! Why, with one blow of my hammer, I--"

Thor explicitly refers to himself as the God of Thunder in response to the Hulk's impious banter

Source: The Avengers (vol. 1) #2 (Nov. 1963): "The Avengers Battle... the Space Phantom", pg. 1-2. Written by Stan Lee. Art by Jack Kirby, Paul Reinman. See also: gods; impiety; Norse/Teutonic paganism; The Hulk (Bruce Banner); Thor (Donald Blake)

BELOW: Thor once again refers to himself as "the God of Thunder":

Thor once again refers to himself as the God of Thunder

Source: The Avengers (vol. 1) #2 (Nov. 1963): "The Avengers Battle... the Space Phantom", pg. 19, panel 5. Written by Stan Lee. Art by Jack Kirby, Paul Reinman. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Thor (Donald Blake)

BELOW: More than mere words: Thor's status as the "God of Thunder" causes the Space Phantom's power to backfire: For the third time in this issue, Thor refers to himself as the "God of Thunder." Here is a demonstration of the fact that this isn't mere braggadocio. Thor's divine nature actually causes the Space Phantom's alien abilities (which are presumably scientifically-based) to backfire. Instead of sending Thor to Limbo, the Space Phantom is himself forced into Limbo. Thor tells the Phantom, "Your power only affects humans!" Of course, we have already seen the Space Phantom's power affect insects and meta-humans (such as the Hulk). But apparently the Space Phantom's power doesn't work on a powerful divine Asgardian deity such as Thor.

More than mere words: Thor's status as the God of Thunder causes the Space Phantom's power to backfire

Source: The Avengers (vol. 1) #2 (Nov. 1963): "The Avengers Battle... the Space Phantom", pg. 21-22. Written by Stan Lee. Art by Jack Kirby, Paul Reinman. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Thor (Donald Blake); The Space Phantom

BELOW: Captain America thinks of Thor as a "norse God"... maybe:

Thor actually did a double take. Steve thought that as long as he might live, he would never see anything quite so strange as a Norse god doing a double take . . . if, that is, he was going along with the proposition that Thor was a Norse god.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 241. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Captain America (Steve Rogers); Thor (Donald Blake)

BELOW: Hawkeye consesses to Thor that he pelted Loki (in disguise as a SHIELD technician present at an Ultimates team meeting) with super-accurately thrown straightened paper clips. Note Hawkeye's explicit reference to Loki as a Norse god.

...and Thor wondered what had really happened.

Clint winked at him. "Can't stand a sneak," he whispered. "Especially a sneaky Norse god. I mean, if you're a Norse god, show yourself."

Clint held up a paper clip, bent straight except for a single curl at one end. He made a flicking motion with the fingers of his right hand. "Sent him a little greeting card, is all."

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 200. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Thor (Donald Blake); Hawkeye (Clint Barton); Loki

BELOW: Thor ponders Captain America's belief system:

What would he have told Rogers? That Loki had taken a special interest in him? Rogers believed in flag and country, nothing else. His was a pure belief, not ignorant of nuance but dismissive of it, deeply invested in a black-and-white view of the world. There was an innocence about it that gave Rogers much of his strength, but that innocence was also part of what made him a useful tool for those who operated by deceit. Strength of belief, Thor thought, was admirable, but it was a lever that when used against you always tipped you long before you knew it was being used.

And so, Thor thought. I have come looking for him to call him a naif and tell him that my half brother, another god he doesn't believe in, has a plan for him. Hardly an errand with good prospects of success.

To know, and not be believed. This was the lot of the gods. All the same, Thor was glad he wasn't a mortal. Fate would do what Fate did, to Steve Rogers and to them all.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 45. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: belief; gods; knowledge; fate; disbelief; patriotism; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Captain America (Steve Rogers); Thor (Donald Blake); Loki

BELOW: Monsters regarded Mole Man as their god: The Mole Man tells the Fantastic Four that he was once a respected scientist, but everybody ridiculed him for his belief in the existence of Monster Island. Once he actually found the island, he discovered numerous strange and largely mindless creatures. He explained that they came to regard him as their god.

Source: The Fantastic Four - Season 1, Episode 6 (23 Sep. 1978): "The Mole Man". Written by Stan Lee. See also: belief; gods; Mole Man (Harvey Elder)

BELOW: Thor ponders the fate of gods and the goodness of Captain America:

...At times like these, Thor thought, I would just as soon fly, and to hell with this pretense for mortals and their small fears. He felt the absence of Mjolnir in his hands... Being immortal had its privileges . . . and its drawbacks, Thor thought, remembering the dark and shining malice on the face of his half brother.

Steve Rogers is my favorite, Loki had said. That much Thor had told Fury. What he had not mentioned was Loki had said something else. Rogers I love, Loki had said, because he will squeeze so hard with his fists of order that chaos will inevitably squirt out. And laughed, Loki had, long and loud.

Thor picked up the pace, spurred on by a sense he couldn't shake that something was about to happen, some trick about to be played on a man whose goodness would be the lever that evil would use against him. To be a god was to know things; the joke of fate was that too often, what even the gods knew was not quite enough.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 44-45. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; evil; order; knowledge; fate; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Captain America (Steve Rogers); Thor (Donald Blake); Loki

BELOW: Captain America doesn't believe Thor is a god; he thinks Thor is a crazy Communist ("pinko"):

What Steve couldn't figure out was why Thor was along .He couldn't imagine that General Fury had decided to trust an obviously crazy pinko with something as serious as the details of a new Chitauri incursion. Regardless of what Thor had done with the Chitauri bomb in Arizona, Steve didn't for a minute believe in a thunder god. Either the bomb hadn't done what the Chitauri said it would, or the tech in Thor's hammer had some secret functions that he hadn't told any of them about. Whichever it was, Thor was a loose cannon and a security risk. If it was up to Steve, Thor wouldn't have been let within a mile of the Triskelion.

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 112. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; disbelief; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Communist; Captain America (Steve Rogers); Thor (Donald Blake); Chitauri

BELOW: Nick Fury is not comfortable citing the "Norse thunder god" as a source of information:

"Okay," Fury said. "Let' say I believe you. How do you suggest I explain to the congressional inquiry that I knew I had to do it because of the word of the Norse thunder god?"

Thor put away his smile. "Is that the worst problem you can think of?"

Source: The Ultimates: Against All Enemies (2007), pg. 39. Written by Alex Irvine. See also: gods; Norse/Teutonic paganism; Thor (Donald Blake); Nick Fury